Morganite

Morganite

Morganite is a beautiful mineral that is the official jewel of Madagascar. It was named after the famous financier John Pierpont Morgan, who was also a collector of minerals. In this way, his considerable contribution to the development of art, science and the collections of the Natural History Museum in New York and Paris was commemorated. Morganite was not discovered until the beginning of the 20th century in California. Later, these stones were also found in Brazil, Mozambique, Afghanistan, Namibia and Madagascar.

Properties of morganite

Morganite is usually a pink mineral that can be orange or salmon in color. It owes its color to manganese, however, admixtures of iron, cesium, lithium and rubidium can change its color. This gemstone banners can be classified as beryllium, and due to the similarity in chemical structure, it is sometimes called a pink emerald. Morganite hardness on the Mohs scale is rated at 7.5 to 8, which means the mineral is hard and durable. This makes it great for jewelry making.

Morganite jewelery findings and jewelery

Morganite beads are most often available in several pastel colors, including pink, yellow, blue and purple. Usually they are not transparent, because transparent stones are expensive and eagerly used in jewelery to be embedded in polished form of jewelery. Morganite semi-produckt are durable and a pleasure to work with. They are hard to scratch or chip. They have a beautiful, glassy shine that does not change for a long time, thanks to which the jewelry looks like new for a long time.

Morganite beads go great with rose gold, as well as silver and surgical steel. What's more, they are perfectly combined with other natural stone beads, jewelry strings and metal pendants, even enameled ones. Morganite goes well with pearls, glass, as well as resin and acrylic glass.